Veterans Day

Veterans Day. . . . coincides with other holidays, including Armistice Day and Remembrance Day, celebrated in other countries that mark the anniversary of the end of World War I, [which] formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the Armistice with Germany went into effect. . . . . The U.S. holiday was renamed Veterans Day in 1954.
Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day, a U.S. public holiday in May; Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day honors those who died while in military service.
Spelling of Veterans Day—While the holiday is commonly printed as Veteran’s Day or Veterans’ Day in calendars and advertisements (spellings that are grammatically acceptable), the United States Department of Veterans Affairs website states that the attributive (no apostrophe) rather than the possessive case is the official spelling “because it is not a day that ‘belongs’ to veterans, it is a day for honoring all veterans.” Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to The United States of America for an amount up to and including their life.
“No man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his body, to risk his well being, to risk his life for a great cause.” —Theodore Roosevelt
To all American military veterans, we salute you and thank you for your service to America and the sacrifices you made to keep America free!